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Beyond the rhetoric

Living and working in Brighton, I've seen what a Green Party in charge of services looks like - they run our local council. So I wasn’t surprised when Natalie Bennett imploded under the weight of a bit of tough questioning.

Much like the Lib Dems before the last General Election, the Greens promise much but delivered little.

I'm a refuse worker. Last year I was forced to take industrial action as the Green Council proposed to cut up to £4,000 a year from my pay and that of my fellow workers. They dressed it up as ‘modernisation’ but whatever they chose to call it, it was a pay cut for people who weren’t earning a King’s ransom to start with. 

Nor have the Greens delivered on flagship policies. In the last year, the Council has actually dropped in the national rankings for how much it recycles, it’s currently 306th out of 326 authorities making it one of the worse in the country (#YouHadOneJob!). I look at the policies they shout about in debates now, and think 'yeah, that sounds good, but how would it work in practice?' because as much as a ciziten's income sounds like a good idea, all the research shows it's the poorest that would lose out most, just like our refuse workers here in Brighton. 

But it’s not just people in Brighton who’ve had a rough deal at the hands of the Greens. In Leeds when they got a chance, the Green councillors propped up a Tory/Lib Dem coalition and that's before it was fashionable.

If we’re honest, the harsh reality on May 7th is this: if you live in a seat Labour could win, and vote for the Greens, you're giving the keys to Number 10 to David Cameron. 

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